Two is better than one | PAWS Chicago

When it comes to tiny kittens, two is always better than one. Not only is it twice the cuteness, having a built-in playmate keeps them happier, healthier, and out of trouble.  

Lucky for you, we have as many kittens as you like! Every spring, PAWS is flooded with large litters and lonely orphans, all looking for homes.    

At the beginning of summer, we set out to find homes for 350 kittens by August 31. Thanks to the PAWS community, we’re almost there with time to spare, and we’re raising our goal to 425!

Meet Adoptable Kittens

Ready to meet a few of the cuddly cuties looking for a home?

Welcoming Home Cat(s)

Brush up on best practices for welcoming home a new cat (or two).

 

Kitten Adoption Requirements

While cats are often thought to be solitary creatures, they are actually very social – and they lean on each other for their feline social development! Because kittens and cats do not typically go to training classes, daycare or walks outside, they need additional enrichment and exercise in the home. A second kitten companion is a great way to provide build in playmates for cats – and a wonderful way to save two lives in need! 

Kitten Companionship

Kittens are curious and crave constant stimulation. When bored, a single kitten will find potentially troublesome ways to entertain himself – like chewing on plants, climbing drapes and furniture, unrolling toilet paper, or exploring electrical cords and sockets. When a kitten has another feline friend to play with, it is less likely they’ll entertain themself with these destructive behaviors!

Kitten Socialization

Kittens want and need interaction with other kittens for healthy social development. A kitten learns a lot in the first several months of life from his mother and littermates and, when adopted from PAWS, from their kitten roommates. While this isn’t to say a solo kitten can’t be happy and healthy alone, kittens who are able to remain with one of their littermates or a similarly-aged companion tend to be healthier, happier, and better-socialized than those who are a household’s only cat.

We understand that space, resources and preference can make a single cat the preferred option for some adopters. Our felines 13 weeks and up are able to be adopted out as single cats unless there is a special adoption note on their ComPETibility profile

 

Not ready to adopt but still want to help?

Learn about becoming a foster parent to some furbabies in need.

 

I FOUND A KITTEN! WHAT DO I DO?